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arjorie McCall’s story is a fascinating and eerie one that has been passed down through the generations in Northern Ireland. It’s a tale of mystery, superstition, and the grave robbing that was prevalent in the 19th century. In this article, we’ll take a closer look at Marjorie McCall’s story and examine the facts and legends surrounding her death and resurrection.

Marjorie McCall was born in Lurgan, County Armagh, Northern Ireland, in 1705. She was married to a man named John McCall, who worked as a doctor. The couple had three children together. According to legend, Marjorie was a beautiful woman who was admired by many in the community.

The circumstances of Marjorie’s death

On March 4, 1705, Marjorie McCall fell ill with a fever. Her husband, John, treated her with the medical knowledge he had, but her condition worsened. She eventually slipped into a coma and was pronounced dead on March 5, 1705. Marjorie was buried in Shankill Cemetery in Lurgan the following day.

However, legend has it that John McCall had doubts about whether or not Marjorie was truly dead. He had heard stories of people being mistakenly declared dead and then waking up in their coffins. In an effort to ease his own fears, John instructed the gravedigger to put a window in Marjorie’s coffin. The idea was that he could look in and see if there were any signs of life.

Marjorie’s resurrection

A few nights after Marjorie’s burial, two men named William Hare and William Burke broke into the Shankill Cemetery with the intention of stealing her body. Hare and Burke were known grave robbers who sold cadavers to medical schools for dissection. They had heard rumors that Marjorie was buried with valuable jewelry, and they hoped to make a profit by selling it.

When Hare and Burke opened Marjorie’s coffin, they were surprised to find her still warm and breathing. According to legend, Marjorie woke up as soon as she was exposed to the fresh air. Terrified, the two men fled the scene and reported the incident to the authorities.

Marjorie was rescued from her coffin and taken back to her home, where she eventually recovered from her illness. She went on to live for another eight years, and the story of her miraculous resurrection became a popular legend in Northern Ireland.

Fact or Fiction?

While the story of Marjorie McCall’s resurrection is a fascinating one, it’s important to examine it critically to separate fact from fiction. There are several versions of the story, and some details may have been embellished or exaggerated over time.

For example, there is no concrete evidence that John McCall actually had a window installed in Marjorie’s coffin. It’s possible that this detail was added to the story to make it more dramatic. Additionally, there is no way to know for certain if Marjorie was actually still alive when Hare and Burke opened her coffin. It’s possible that she was in a state of suspended animation, which can sometimes occur in cases of severe illness.

What we do know is that grave robbing was a common practice in 19th century Ireland. Medical schools were in need of cadavers for dissection, but there were strict laws surrounding the procurement of bodies. This led to a lucrative trade in stolen corpses, and many people feared that they would be targeted by grave robbers after their death.

Marjorie McCall’s story has become a popular legend in Northern Ireland, and it continues to be passed down

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